July 23, 2018

Hospitals contain patients who need constant care and supervision.Nurses are hired to work all day or all night with several breaks in between. They may barely have enough time to sit down and rest. So, nursing is one of the riskiest and unhealthiest jobs in any industry. Here are the biggest health risks that affect nurses after long workdays.

Fatigued Driving

Some nurses work all night shifts, while others have very long workdays, sometimes as many as 12 hours. Nurses are known to drive home at night, even while they are tired. In fact, distracted driving is one of the leading causes of car accidents in the U.S. There are thousands of deaths that occur each year when individuals, including professionals, do not get enough rest.

Lingering Illness

Nurses are encouraged not to work while they are sick; however, many still do. However, sick workers are naturally slower and less productive than healthy ones. Some nurses have health problems that are more serious than common colds. They may suffer from chronic wrist or back pain that worsens after a long day's work.

Insomnia

Not all people are able to sleep easily when they get the chance. Insomnia is a condition that makes it difficult or impossible for people to fall asleep. Some nurses are too stimulated after consuming a lot of caffeine to stay awake. Other nurses throw off their natural sleep cycles and get used to sleeping only a few hours a day.

Careless Hygiene

After a long workday, nurses get tired and then become careless with their actions. The longer they work, the more mistakes they unknowingly make. Some nurses become careless to the point of jeopardizing their health. They may avoid putting on their gloves to clean or not wash their hands properly.


Nurses take shots and practice good hygiene to keep themselves safe. However, one mistake with a patient could cause a viral or bacterial infection that turns into an illness. Medical professionals should remember the importance of always being clean and orderly.


Nurses are the most valuable members of a hospital or medical facility. They work round the clock, checking up on the patients' needs, poring over documents and standing for hours at a time. In addition, they work with sick people and handle their fluids. Nurses should reduce the health risks of their jobs by remaining cautious before, during and after their long shifts.


References:

The Kindley Firm, APC

DiversityNursing Blog


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